House of Burgesses


    Many people take government for advantage. Government has not been around all the time. It came about in the New World in 1619 with the House of Burgesses. The House of Burgesses they was the first representative assembly in the colonies, that helped to bring order to the colonies.

    The first form of government that ever began in America was the House of Burgesses, which started in Virginia in 1619. People were encouraged to come to the “New Land” because of its success, also leading them to North Carolina. It is important to realize how the House of Burgesses was successful. First of all, the members of the House disagreed a lot less, and this created a friendly environment where more important things could be accomplished. Another reason, is that it gained more and more power through the years until it became more powerful than the governor and council.

    The Virginia House of Burgesses’ members consisted of a governor and his council, and six representatives, which were called “Burgesses”. Members were elected by the existing Burgesses and it was voted whether or not a member got to move to a higher office.

    The first governor to establish the House of Burgesses in Virginia in 1619 was Governor George Yeardly. Every member was required to serve his state to the best of his ability. Its success contributed to the development of representative government in America.

    So in conclusion, the House of Burgesses was the most successful and first form of government in America. It may have lost its power to make laws once, but over time it won back its power and its power led to the government that we have in America today. The Virigina House of Burgesses was an experiement with Democratic government that proved to be succesful and productive enough to last through the years.












Google Search: "House of Burgesses". 15 Nov. 2001 http://images.google.com/images?q=%22House+of+Burgesses%22&hl=en.
“House of Burgesses." Encyclopedia Bitannica. Vol. 2. Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc, 1768-1771. 646
"House of Burgesses." Encylopedia American. Vol. 28. Grolier Incorporated, 1996. 162-167.

"House of Burgesses." Merit Students Encyclopedia. Vol. 3. Macmillan Educational Corporation, 1980. 529.

Netscape: The House of Burgesses http://www.beyondbooks.com/ush72/2f.asp Wednesday, November 7, 2001

Netscape: THE HOUSE OF BURGESSES http://www.degraffenried.com/text/events_award/essay1.html Wednesday, November 7, 2001






Created By,
Susan T. and Heather M.
Return to the Colonial America Projects Page